Friday, August 25, 2017

Oh No, I Found Termites!

According to the National Pest Management Association, termites cause an estimated $5 million worth of damage annually to homes and other businesses in the United States. Even if your home is made of brick or stone, termites can still do damage on structural supports, windows and door frames, insulation, plaster, baseboards and even items like books.


Does Your Home Have Termites

- Wood damage: This is probably the most well-known sign that termites have entered your home. Severely damaged, when tapped, will sound hollow.

- Mud tubes: You may also see mud tubes along walls, baseboards or in crack and crevices.

- Blistering, sagging laminate flooring: This is often a sign that termites are hard at work in the floorboards underneath. A spongy floor is also a red flag.

- Unexplained cracks: Whether it's an exterior wall or an interior wall, it could be a sign that termites are presents. Cracks along ceilings, beams, decks and wooden fences could also mean there are termites on your property.

- Sticking windows and doors: If you're having a hard time opening and closing windows it could be because termites are tunneling inside the frames causing them to become misshapen.


What You Should Do

If you think your home has termites, it's best to call a professional Lake of the Ozarks pest control company. They can help you assess the situation and help you with a treatment plan to get rid of them. It's best not to go the DIY route with termites, as they are very difficult to get rid of and most home applications for termites can't get to the root of the problem, which could be deep inside the walls, so it will be ineffective.

Prevent Termites

- Schedule a termite check with a pest control expert every 2-3 years.

- Remove as leaks around your house from plumbing or gutters, as subterranean termites love moisture. Keep gutters and downspouts clear of debris.

- Seal or fill in any cracks in the foundation, concrete and around the roof. Fix any broken or waterlogged roof tiles, which could as an entry point for both moisture and termites.


Although spring is the time most termites swarm, they are active all year round, as our home are kept at a comfortable temperature most of the time. If you suspect termites are in your home, don't wait and call the Best Pest Control company at the Lake of the Ozarks at 573-342-1600. Termites can do quite a bit of damage in a short amount of time, so don't hesitate and call as soon as you spot them.

THE LAKE'S MOST TRUSTED PEST CONTROL COMPANY

Visit our website:
Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on LinkedIn
Follow us on Google+

573-348-1600 in Osage Beach

Friday, August 18, 2017

What You May Have Not Have Known About Groundhogs

If you've traveled around the Lake area, you may have seen groundhogs out and about. Although these furry creatures may be cute, they can tear apart your yard in search of food and a safe place to burrow. We see these groundhogs all over the place, but how much do we know about them? Best Pest Control has a few interesting facts you may not have known about groundhogs.


They're Related To Squirrels 

Groundhogs are a type of rodent known as a marmot, which are closely related to squirrels. Groundhogs can be found all over North America. In fact, they're the most widely distributed marmot, some are even found in Alaska 

Woodchuck Has Nothing To Do With Wood

Groundhogs have many different names including whistle-pig for their tendency to emit short, high-pitched whistles. They're also known as land beavers, but their most famous nickname is the woodchuck. However, the name woodchuck doesn't have anything to do with wood. It's thought to be taken from the Native American words wejack, woodshaw, or woodchoock

They're Loners

Unlike their cousins the prairie dogs, groundhogs like to be alone seeking out their own kind only to mate. They're solitary for most of the year, so males need to seek out the females to mate. Even their maternal duty to their young is short. The mother will nurse the young and shortly after they're weaned they tend to go off on their own.



They Fall Into A Deep, Deep Sleep

Groundhogs are known as true hibernators, which means they go into a dormant state in which their body temperature and heart rate fall dramatically from late fall until late winter or early spring. True hibernators are the ones that can reduce their body temperatures below 68 degrees. They can also reduce their heart rate down to about five beats per minute. However, it's not a deep sleep that continues all winter long. They'll go into a deep sleep where their body temperature drops for a week, then wake up for three or four days, then go back to sleep. They can do this about 12 to 20 times in a hibernation season.

Their Homes Are Impressive

A groundhog's burrow can be anywhere from 8 - 66 feet long with multiple exits and a number of chambers. There can be several levels to their burrows as well. They have a burrow for hibernating and then another level that is higher up where they can come out more easily. In some cases, groundhogs have more than one residence and move from one burrow to another. Although these tunnels are impressive, they can do some serious damage to your yard. Luckily, Best Pest Control company at the Lake of the Ozarks can help!

If you're dealing with groundhogs in your yard, Best Pest Control can help! In addition to pest control, we also offer animal trapping services at the Lake of the Ozarks. To learn more about our services, call us at 573-348-1600.

THE LAKE'S MOST TRUSTED PEST CONTROL COMPANY

Visit our website:
Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on LinkedIn
Follow us on Google+

573-348-1600 in Osage Beach

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Common Pest Control Myths DEBUNKED!

When it comes to pest control, many homeowners believe they can solve a problem with a simple DIY trick. What actually works though? We want our customers to be smarter about pest control, so we've debunked some common myths about pest control.


Myth: My cat will take care of the rodents. 
Truth: Most domestic cats have no interest in being your pest control technician. While they may chase mice and catch one occasionally, they do it out of a playful spirit. They don't see mice as a threat that they need to get rid of, so they will typically ignore them. Rodents can avoid your pets by traveling on surfaces and in spaces your pets can't reach. They may even be more attracted to your home because of your pet's food and droppings.

Myth: My house is clean, so I don't have a pest problem.
Truth: Your house is not shielded from pests because it's clean. This myth, unfortunately, causes a lot of homeowners to drop their guard and become susceptible to infestations like bed bugs. While it's true a dirty home can welcome in pests, a clean home isn't safe either. Pests go to where their food source is, so if that's blood, it doesn't matter if your home is clean or dirty.

Myth: The best bait for mice is cheese. 
Truth: Although we've seen cartoon mice enjoying chunks of cheese, it's not entirely true in real life. Mice would rather eat food with higher sugar content. So instead of baiting your trap with cheese, bits of cereal, cookies, sugar cubes or peanut butter would be more enticing to mice.


Myth: I don't see a pest issue, so I don't have one. 
Truth: Not seeing a giant outbreak in your home is comforting to some. However, just because you don't see pests, it doesn't mean you don't have any. Many pests, such as termites and carpenter ants, can do quite a bit of damage to your home before the signs are obvious. It's best to have your house sprayed and looked at on a regular basis to prevent pests from becoming an issue.

Myth: I don't need a professional. I can take care of the pests myself. 
Truth: While termites and bed bugs are best left to the professionals, they're not the only pests technicians can help you with. While DIY tactics may get rid of the pests, they'll most likely come back. The only way to be completely pest free is by hiring a professional pest control company. It will save you time, frustration and money.

If you need help solving your home's pest control problem, call Best Pest Control company at the Lake of the Ozarks. Our technicians are trained to tackle all pests that infect the Lake of the Ozarks. To learn more about our services and to schedule your appointment, contact us at 573-348-1600.

THE LAKE'S MOST TRUSTED PEST CONTROL COMPANY

Visit our website:
Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on LinkedIn


Follow us on Google+

573-348-1600 in Osage Beach

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Reasons Why Mosquitoes Bite Some People More Than Others

Have you ever spent a summer evening hanging outside with friends only to find yourself covered in itchy red mosquito bites and your friends saying they have none? You're not alone! It turns out that mosquitoes really are drawn to some people more than others. While scientists don't yet have a cure for mosquito bites other than not getting bit, they do have some ideas as to why some of us are getting eaten alive and others are untouched. Here are a few reasons as to why your summers may be spent constantly itching mosquito bites.


You're Pregnant

Unfortunately, those who probably want to get bit the least are the ones who attract mosquitoes the most. In several different studies, pregnant women have been found to attract mosquitoes twice as much as others. This is probably due to the fact that they exhale about 21 percent more carbon dioxide and on average are about 1.26 degrees warmer than others.

You Have The Right Blood Type

Just like you have favorite foods, mosquitoes also have a favorite blood type. Studies have found that those with Type O blood are twice as attractive to mosquitoes than those with Type A blood. Those with Type B are somewhere in the middle. In addition, about 85 percent of people produce a secretion that tells mosquitoes what blood type they are, so they are drawn to those types of people more than the non-secretors, regardless of blood type.


You're Exercising

Mosquitoes use their sense of smell to seek out their food source, and they are attracted to certain smells, such as lactic acid, uric acid, ammonia and other compounds that are emitted in sweat. They also like people who run warmer, so a hot sweaty human is quite delicious to them.

You're Breathing Heavily

In addition to strenuous exercise, mosquitoes are also attracted to carbon dioxide, which is emitted when breathing. Mosquitoes are extremely attracted to carbon dioxide and can detect it up to 164 feet away using an organ called a maxillary palp. People who simply exhale more of the gas over time have been shown to attract more mosquitoes than others This is one reason why children tend to get bit less often than adults.

You're Drinking Beer

Not to ruin your fun weekend plans, but studies have found that mosquitoes tend to bite people more after they had just finished drinking a beer. Just a single 12-ounce bottle of beer can make you more attractive to these little suckers. However, scientists don't know the reason why. They thought it was because drinking increases the amount of ethanol excreted in sweat or because it increases body temperature, but neither of these factors was found to correlate with mosquito landings.


You're Wearing Dark Colors

In addition to using their sense of smell, mosquitoes also use their eyes to target their victims. Mosquitoes are highly visual, and wearing colors that stand out, such as black, dark blue or red may make you easier to find.

Although mosquitoes may just be drawn to you, there are a few things you can do to protect yourself from getting bitten by these pesky pests. The best way to keep mosquitoes out of your yard is by calling Best Pest Control company at the Lake of the Ozarks and have us come out to treat your lawn. Our technicians know how to properly treat pests that infect central Missouri so you can enjoy summer the way it was meant to be - outside!

THE LAKE'S MOST TRUSTED PEST CONTROL COMPANY

Visit our website:
Like us on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter
Follow us on LinkedIn


Follow us on Google+

573-348-1600 in Osage Beach